Students’ Patronage of Guidance and Counselling Services in Senior High Schools in Ghana

Main Article Content

Joshua-Luther Ndoye Upoalkpajor
Veronica Esinam Eggley
Matthew Kojo Namale

Abstract

Guidance and counselling services are extensively known to be advantageous in shaping the decision making and thinking capabilities of both students and even people at work places. However, the services appears to be lacking in Senor High Schools (SHSs) in Ghana. This study explored students' patronage of guidance and counselling services in SHSs in Ghana. The study further identified the factors affecting students' patronage of guidance and counselling services. The study was targeted to Form 2 and 3 students. Using a cross sectional design, 24 SHSs were selected out of 475 through a multi-stage sampling technique. The final sample made up of 2,969 Form 2 and 3 SHS students with a return rate of 98.25 percent. Survey questionnaire was used as the main data collection instrument. The data was analysed using percentages and frequency counts, as well as one-sample t-test analysis. It was found that students are aware of the  presence of guidance and counselling services (educational counselling especially) in their schools. However, the patronage of the services was low due to factors like accessibility of the services, misconceptions held by the students, issues of confidentiality, and counsellor as teacher. The study recommended that GES together with headteachers of SHSs to provide guidance and counselling facilities and logistics which enhances the work of the counsellor. Again, the GES is advised not to allow counsellors posted to schools to engage in any teaching activities.

Keywords:
Guidance and counselling services;, patronage, counsellor, Senior High Schools.

Article Details

How to Cite
Upoalkpajor, J.-L., Eggley, V., & Namale, M. (2018). Students’ Patronage of Guidance and Counselling Services in Senior High Schools in Ghana. Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 28(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.9734/JESBS/2018/45093
Section
Original Research Article