Intentional Interactions and Identity Development: Perspectives on Education?

Main Article Content

Michael T. Miller
David M. Deggs

Abstract

This study utilized self-report survey data to explore formal, intentional interactions measurably impacting an individual’s identity among three groups in the mid-western United States. Data were collected across three levels: individual college-aged students in late-adolescence or early-adulthood, parents of college students, and adult community citizens. The mean scores of all three groups were compared using ANOVA and revealed no significant difference between the three groups, thus suggesting that students, parents, and community members agree that their direct words influence the actions of others. The results of the study illustrate both the impact and influence of parents on children, that it is difficult to measure inter-relationship between parent and child, and the interactions between these groups can be difficult to measure, suggesting a complicated relationship. However, the study does underscore the profound impact that people around children have on identity development and ultimately student actions.

Keywords:
Intentional interactions, identity development, ANOVA, college students.

Article Details

How to Cite
Miller, M. T., & Deggs, D. M. (2020). Intentional Interactions and Identity Development: Perspectives on Education?. Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 33(9), 14-22. https://doi.org/10.9734/jesbs/2020/v33i930254
Section
Original Research Article

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